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HYPER H2-Refuel Performance

We will be using EES (engineering equation solver) to mathematically map our system. This program uses thermodynamic properties and laws to ensure our system will function from component to component. This includes energy balance equations and mass balance equations when applicable. Here is a link to the EES website if you wish to learn more about their program ( http://www.fchart.com/ees/). We also developed a basic properties chart to ensure neighboring components have matching states as pictured below:

Input output

We have chosen the respective individual components after ensuring that our states matched up. We then used EES to model our entire system and evaluate its performance as a whole. ***EES Solved the mass, energy, and entropy balances, for all the streams in the following flow diagram:

System Flow Diagram:

Flow diagram

 

 

The state of each hydrogen stream is as follows:Theory 10-28

 

The overall power consumption for compression in the main cycle is 42.5 kW, with 5.6 kW of heat exhausted to the Liquid Nitrogen Cycle.

Our entire system will be functioning out of a Light Air Mobile Shelter by Insitu. This container has the capacity rating and specifications as follows in the given table:

Table

These specifications do not encompass the possibilities of having components that are not fastened to the ground but that are instead suspended in air. Further research and planning of the most efficient way to setup our container is undoubtedly needed. We do know though that we will not have enough floor space to fit each component and our current plan for this is to bolt components that will not experience vigorous movements to the ceiling and walls of our container. Large and movement prone components such as our compressor will have to be fastened in the most secure way, which in our case will be the floor.

National Electrical Code Classification:

Electrical devices used in hazardous areas need to be certified for use according the requirements specified for the area for this project. In general hazardous locations in North America are separated by classes, divisions, and groups to define the level of safety required for equipment installed in these locations.

The classes define the general nature of hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere. Class I is a general nature of hazardous material for this project because flammable gases or vapors are present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures.

The division defines the probability of hazardous material being present in an ignitable concentration in the surrounding atmosphere. Division 2 is the probability of hazardous material being present in n ignitable concentration in the surrounding atmosphere in this project, because the substance referred to by class is present only in abnormal conditions, such as a container failure or system breakdown.

The group defines the hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere. Group B is the hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere in this project because hydrogen is the hazardous material in group B.

The link to the code is: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/hazardous-areas-classification-d_345.html

 

Washington State University