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Jacob Leachman Hydrogen Properties for Energy Research (HYPER) Laboratory

Cool. Fuel.

Cool. Fuel.

The only cryogenic hydrogen research laboratory in US academia.

Innovating electrofuels since 2010.

 

Innovations

 

Cryogenic Origami Bellows

Imagine the challenge of storing and reliably dispensing fuel at -421°F, the temperature of liquid hydrogen. Go one step further — try it in microgravity. Not hard enough? If a vapor bubble leaves the bottom of the tank you’ll explode the turbo of your engine.

 

 

 

Heisenberg Vortex

One of the greatest issues in developing a sustainable hydrogen economy is the issue of infrastructure. This project found that tube geometry can help cool gases, requiring less energy to keep fuel at cryogenic temperatures.

 

 

 

Genii

The first liquid hydrogen fueled drone by a University. Fourteen flights proved the airframe, electric propulsion, and guidance systems were working beautifully, and extensive ground testing and characterization of the hydrogen systems showed the fuel cell hydrogen powertrain was up to the task.

 

 

Get Involved

Interested in helping the lab? The HYPER Lab appreciates new partners for projects, on-campus work, and facility use. Get involved today.

Ways to get involved

Featured Posts

 

  • How to Procure Parts Easily and Efficiently – The HYPER Way

    Have you ever had a $45,000 piece of equipment show up in your facility, and thought: “I don’t remember what this is for…”? Well, I had this exact thing happen to me. I was fortunate in that the 900 pounds of equipment sitting in the shipping bay was a simple mix-up with the company delivering our equipment. Crisis averted! However, in many instances mistakes like this can lead to the loss of funds, and sometimes even jobs. The responsibility often falls to project managers to have a crystal-clear picture of the flow of parts and equipment coming in for their systems.

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  • How to make cryogenic Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) shields

    MLI Basics

    The Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) Shield (aka thermal radiation blanket) is very important in cryogenic systems. MLI shields insulate components from thermal energy transferred via light on rockets, satellites, and cryogenic experiments. The shield consists of 10s of alternating layers of polymer mesh and reflective mylar (metalized nylon) film. To understand how MLI blankets work, consider an equation approximating the resistance to radiative heat transfer:

    R_rad= 1/(A_s σϵ4(T_s^2+T_sur^2)(T_s^2+T_sur))

    where As = radiating surface area, σ = Stefan-Boltzmann constant, ϵ= emissivity, Ts = the absolute surface temperature, Tsur = absolute surroundings temperature. Or more generally: q” = σϵ(T_sur^4-T_s^4) assuming the surface is at lower temperature … » More …

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  • Getting Back to Work…At Work (The HYPER Guide to Returning to the Lab Safely)

    A new semester has begun, summer is upon us, and research is kicking into high gear…but we are not operating under normal conditions. The pandemic has laid new challenges at our feet which has completely changed how we approach even the simplest of tasks. It is important, now more than ever, to band together as a lab community and apply our HYPER ethics to tackle these obstacles.

    As quarantine restrictions loosen in our state and we can begin returning to work, albeit restricted, we have created a plan for returning to work that help us to stay on track with our research goals while maintaining … » More …

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  • How we made (and remade) the HYPER community website

    It took 10 years for me to start calling the HYPER laboratory a community. In one month we’ll have had a website for six of those ten years. In many ways those first six years were much like the six year tenure process we follow as faculty. While we’ve continually added content (>300 posts and >75 pages) within our core themes of Research, Teaching, and Service, we’ve never really sat back and thought about how to make the site truly great. This post tells the story of how the site evolved, from starting as one of the ‘guinea pig’ sites my neighbor friends (Steve Locker … » More …

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  • ‘A Fee is a Price’ transferred to Grading Rubrics

    Most professors face the problem of developing a “Grading Rubric“: or the list of scores and deductions to be given for attributes of an assignment. To give you an idea of where rubrics are at in engineering education, the leading voice in engineering education pedagogy, Richard Felder advocates rigorous assessment with rubric transparency.
    Contrast these complex grading rubrics with what one of my good friends recently told a class:
    “You lose a letter grade every time your group is responsible for schedule slip that could have been avoided if you had cared… — if you hold final construction up, even by a class, you’re down a …

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